The 2013 Marine Corps Marathon kicks off in Rosslyn. Photo: Jimmy Daly

The 2013 Marine Corps Marathon kicks off in Rosslyn. Photo: Jimmy Daly

The 42st Marine Corps Marathon will bring tens of thousands of runners and spectators to D.C., Arlington and the National Harbor.  The extra miles around the Pentagon parking lots and Crystal City are gone and runners will get two more miles on scenic Rock Creek Parkway. Whether they’re gunning for the win, hoping for a personal record or just trying to cross the finish line, they’ll be making memories along the way.

What’s happening:

The Metro will once again open at 6 a.m., allowing the course to go back to its 2013-2015 configuration.

 

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Race smarter: run the tangents

Cut possible minutes off of your time by running as close to 26.2 miles as possible. Senior Editor Dickson Mercer takes you through how you can approach the race as strategically as possible.

 

 

Photo: Steve Laico

Throngs of spectators wait near the finish line at the 2015 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Steve Laico

Marine Corps Marathon Spectator’s Guide

We asked local runners and their friends for their best advice to making the most out of that morning. Use this guide while developing your plan for the day to best support your runner and make the most of your morning!

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Look for D.C. running’s superfan

Somewhere along the course, you’ll hear music. Then you’ll see a character from the movie The Incredibles. And then you’ll understand the enthusiasm Paul Silberman brings to local road races.

Alex Hetherington at mile 16 of the 2015 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Cheryl Young

Alex Hetherington at mile 16 of the 2015 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Cheryl Young

Running gave Alex Hetherington an identity beyond being a Marine

“It gave me an identity beyond being a Marine,” he said. “You think being a Marine is an identity in and of itself, but you’re in a squadron with a bunch of other pilots who are just like you. That’s who you work with day in and day out, and running was sort of a way to be a little bit different. It was my persona.”

Mark Cucuzzella gets down to the real basics while talking to a Two Rivers Treads customer. Photo by Nadav Neuhaus

Mark Cucuzzella gets down to the real basics while talking to a Two Rivers Treads customer. Photo by Nadav Neuhaus

Mark Cucuzzella wants a solid foundation for military service members

Mark Cucuzzella’s highest hopes for running don’t involve him breaking the tape at a marathon. Or posting amazing sales figures at his West Virginia running store, Two Rivers Treads. He wants every military service member to be able to run injury-free.

A look back: Marine Corps Marathon 2015

Trevor Lafontaine leads Oscar Santos through mile 15. Photo: Steve Laico

Trevor Lafontaine leads Oscar Santos through mile 15. Photo: Steve Laico

Lafontaine, Mendez Suanca win see-saw MCM battles

Trevor Lafontaine had never raced longer than a 10k when he took the line at the 40th Marine Corps Marathon. A little more than two hours and 24 minutes later, he had won.

Runner head down Rock Creek Parkway during mile 11 of the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Charlie Ban

Runner head down Rock Creek Parkway during mile 11 of the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Charlie Ban

Sunday’s 40th Marine Corps Marathon started out on the wrong foot when rain and unusually long, slow security lines frustrated thousands of runners, but fortunately, it’s not how you start a marathon, it’s how you finish.

Luckily, it’s how you finish

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Joe Divel. Photo: Dustin Whitlow

Joe Did It!

Joe Divel took the enthusiasm that guided his training with him on marathon day.

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Will Etti. Photo: Dustin Whitlow

Will Etti Cuts Down His Time

Will Etti completed the Marine Corps Marathon in 5 hours and 14 minutes, a 37 minute PR over last year’s effort.  In last year’s Marine Corps Marathon effort, Etti hobbled through cramping through the later stages of the race, an experience that has been at the forefront of his mind since he began training for this year’s redemption six months ago.

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Amelia McKeithen at the 2015 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Steve Laico

The Freewheelin’ Amelia McKeithen

Amelia McKeithen didn’t go in for a rigid training plan that told her what days to run, when to cross-train, or what to eat.  She knew back in March when she committed to running the Marine Corps Marathon as a fundraiser for The Children’s Inn at NIH that a structure like that would cramp her style.

Hand-crank cyclists lead off the 2013 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Hand-crank cyclists lead off the 2013 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

D.C. races: a handcycle mecca

Push-rim wheelchair racers and handcyclists are familiar on the courses of D.C.-area races, but that’s not the case elsewhere in the country.

2014

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Samuel Kosgei on his way to winning the 2014 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Charlie Ban

Marine Corps Marathon winners make moves on the Mall

Amid the museums that line the National Mall, Spc. Samuel Kosgei and Capt. Meghan Curran carved out their place in history when they both took leads in the Marine Corps Marathon that they would hold to the finish. Along the way, they both led their respective U.S. Army teams to military marathon team championships.

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Jilanne Doom cruises through Georgetown during the 2014 Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Charlie Ban

Volunteers make the day for Marine Corps Marathon runners

While many loved the scenic course, crowd support, and near perfect weather, runners at Sunday’s Marine Corps Marathon universally raved about one thing: Marine volunteers who motivated them to cross the finish line.

 

©Sara (Hartenstine) Alepin {Photos from the Harty ı Wedding, Event, Portrait, and Lifestyle Photography}www.PhotosFromTheHarty.com

George Banker at the Marine War Memorial. Photo: Sara Hartenstine Alepin,  Photos from the Harty 

George Banker and his Marine Corps Marathon resume

To pin a label on George Banker, you’d have to get him to slow down first. He’s a runner, an organizer, a historian, a photographer, a speaker, a joker, a mentor, a problem solver, and whatever else anyone needs him to be.

2013

Army Capt. Kelly Calway just after the 19 mile mark of the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Army Capt. Kelly Calway just after the 19 mile mark of the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Calway notches MCM title, Olympic Trials qualifier

With a strong lead in the Marine Corps Marathon, Army Capt. Kelly Calway had her opportunity–run harder now or spend seven months regretting it. With an impending deployment to Kuwait waiting for her a week later, the cool day in Washington was her chance to take care of qualifying for the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Girma Bedada holds a sizable lead five miles into the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo:Jimmy Daly Girma Bedada holds a sizable lead five miles into the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo:Jimmy Daly

Girma Bedada holds a sizable lead five miles into the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Men’s MCM winner holds lead for more than 25 miles

Wire-to-wire. It almost has no place in any talk about a marathon, maybe only in a tall tale. The race is too long, too grueling, too open to disruption. But Girma Bedada did it at the Marine Corps Marathon, running 2:21:31.

Marine Corps Marathon runners relax and convalesce after the race. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Marine Corps Marathon runners relax and convalesce after the race. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Marine Corps midpackers find a lot to like

Much like Girma Bedada and Kelly Calway‘s efforts, Mike Kunzer‘s race at the Marine Corps Marathon was the culmination of years of preparation and training.

 

Spectators cheer for family and friends along Jefferson Drive along the National Mall. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Spectators cheer for family and friends along Jefferson Drive along the National Mall. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Marine Corps Marathon spectators prove running is a team sport

They hold their signs proudly while their eyes scan the road. It’s not easy: being in the right place at the right time. All the while they wonder: Do I have their pace right in my head? Did I miss them?

Rock Creek Parkway during the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Rock Creek Parkway during the Marine Corps Marathon. Photo: Jimmy Daly

Shutdown Palace: When the Congressional budget impasse nearly ruined a marathon

Runners run, elected officials legislate and besides the dozens of honorary congressional chairman for the Cherry Blossom Ten Mile, never the twain shall meet. Until October 2013. The first federal government shutdown in 17 years threw the running community into uncertainty as runners were ostensibly banned from National Parks Service property and race permits for that land disintegrated, putting the region’s marquee race in doubt.