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by Maggie Lloyd April 25, 2018 at 11:45 am 0

Mike Katz and his Poäng, along with his race medals. Photo: Steve Laico

What started as an innocent IKEA chair purchase in 2014 has turned into quite the display of race medals for Mike Katz of D.C.

His springy bentwood Poäng, which he pronounces POE-ayng, is adorned with 32 pieces of hardware from marathons, half marathons, relays, ten milers, and more. He layers them on with the completion of each race, hoping (with mixed success) they stay in chronological order.

His favorite? The 2014 Rock ‘n’ Roll USA (now Rock ‘n’ Roll DC) Half Marathon medal has good aesthetics and was the first medal he draped onto the Poäng while unpacking in an otherwise unfurnished apartment in 2014.

Another notable design includes the 2015 Parks Half Marathon medal featuring a wine stopper welded onto the bottom.

His memento from the 2016 Santa Barbara Veterans Day Half Marathon is a round aluminum pendant that a friend hung on a candy necklace with “Good Job Running Boy” written on it in Sharpie.

The Poäng makes an appearance on Katz’s social media accounts from time to time, captioned with some variation of “Another medal for the Poäng!” and the occasional race report.

“I’m gonna need a new medal chair soon if I keep making these terrible choices,” he wrote in 2015.

If it gets to that point, he has his sights set on the children’s version of the Poäng as a contingency.

by Charlie Ban May 30, 2017 at 11:54 am 0

Dustin (left) and Hunter Jutras run the 2015 Army Ten-Miler. Photo courtesy of Jutras family.

Dustin (left) and Hunter Jutras run the 2015 Army Ten-Miler. Photo courtesy of Jutras family.

The Jutras family has been running the Army Ten-Miler since 2003. In that time, the team composition has changed, and so has the reason they run.

Pierre and Julia ran with their eldest son, Dillon, and their daughter Heather. They took a year off and came back in 2005, only without Private First Class Dillon Jutras, who had enlisted in the Army and was serving in Iraq.

Dillon died from combat injuries less than three weeks after deployment. He was 20.

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