Washington, DC

Running Shorts

  • Washington, D.C. native Taylor Knibb finished 16th out of 34 in the Olympic triathlon Monday, finishing in 2:00:59.
  • Georgetown alumna Rachel Schneider (WCP) will race the Olympic 5,000 meter preliminary tomorrow morning (July 30) 6 a.m. Watch the race on Peacock
  • Georgetown alumnus Amos Bartelsmeyer, representing Germany, will race the Olympic 1,500 meter preliminary Monday, Aug. 2 at 8:05 p.m.  Watch the race on CNBC
  • University of Maryland Associate Head Track Coach Danielle Siebert is serving as event manager with USATF during the Olympics.
  • The Association of Road Racing Statisticians ratified Oakton and American University alumna Keira D’Amato’s women’s only 10-mile (51:23) as a world record. She ran the time Nov. 24, 2020 in Anacostia Park in Washington, D.C.
  • The Potomac Valley Track Club, fielded many by D.C.-area residents, finished second overall at the USATF Masters Track and Field Championships, scoring a combined 433 points in men’s and women’s events to the So Cal Track Club’s 666. The men finished second with 227 points to So Cal’s 445 and the women finished third (206 points) behind So Cal (221) and SC Striders (217).

0 Comments

Five years after Loudoun Valley’s Drew Hunter kicked off his professional running career right out of high school, his mother Joan is making the same jump.

She will oversee training for the Boulder-based Timman Elite, an all-male collection of distance runners, including her son, who mostly represent the United States. She brings with her 18 years of high school school coaching at three different Northern Virginia high schools — with two Nike Cross Nationals titles in the last four seasons — and several intervening years coaching a youth team. Hunter served as a remote interim coach since March, before she and husband Marc retired as Loudoun Valley’s track and cross country coaches.

Read More

0 Comments

 

The National Park Service is accepting public comment through Aug. 22 regarding the ongoing closure of Beach Drive to through traffic.

The 4.25-mile stretch of Beach Drive between Broad Branch Road and the Maryland border has been closed since April 2020 to allow more room for physical distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with portions open for cars to reach picnic areas.

The agency offered possible scenerios, including extending the current closure indefinitely, reopening the road — which was rebuilt over the past several years, or exploring the possibility of a hybrid approach, including extending weekend closures to include Mondays and Fridays or opening the road during rush hour on weekdays.

Public comment will be accepted until 11:59 p.m. Aug. 22. To provide comments online or get additional information on the project, visit https://parkplanning.nps.gov/beachdrive. Mailed comments should be postmarked by Aug. 22, 2021, to receive consideration:
Superintendent
ATTN: Beach Drive
Rock Creek Park
3545 Williamsburg Lane, NW
Washington, DC 20008

0 Comments

The days are getting longer and the weather is getting warmer — which can mean one big thing for the running community: more runners are taking to the region’s sidewalks, paths and trails.

As more runners ditch the treadmill in favor of running outside, there are health and safety reminders to consider. Chief among them is knowing the correlation between warmer temperatures and running risk, said Dr. Wiemi Douoguih, the medical director of MedStar Sports Medicine for the Washington region. Spring can yield some warm-but-not-too-warm running conditions, but “just because the air feels [cooler], you have to be careful,” he said.

Temperatures can feel comfortable and quickly get dangerous as you exercise, he said. Runners need to be careful with outdoor exercise when temperatures are between 73 and 82 degrees, but with higher humidity levels — a foregone conclusion in the D.C. area — temperatures as low as 73 can be high risk, Dr. Douoguih said.

Read More

0 Comments

The family she babysat for didn’t need her. The cost of living, with no job, in Westchester, N.Y. was crushing. Her team’s funding was gone. So Katy Kunc came home.

With the pandemic squeezing her out of everything else, she ran the same roads and trails where she discovered her talent for running while at Lake Braddock.

“I started running more than I ever had before,” she said. “I figured I might as well take some kind of risk to get better.”

The 12 weeks of at least 80 miles added up to a whole new level of fitness that Kunc hadn’t reached in two years running for the New Jersey New York Track Club after graduating from the University of Kentucky, and she will be racing the finals of the Olympic Trials in the 3,000 meter steeplechase Thursday at 11:47 eastern. She qualfied for the finals with a 9:37.85 finish, a PR, in the first round.

Read More

0 Comments

Robert Brandt was eyeing graduate school programs in real estate development because he likes being a part of building something.

He already has some experience doing it with the latest Georgetown track team, accounting for two of the men’s team’s four All-American finishes last week in Eugene, Ore. Brandt finished fourth in the 10,000 meters and fifth in the 5,000, while junior Jack Salisbury finished sixth in the 1,500 meters (3:40.06) and freshman Parker Stokes finished eighth in the 3,000 meter steeplechase (8:33.44). Sophomore Sami Corman was an honorable mention for the women’s team, and  among local natives, Diego Zarate (Virginia Tech) from Northwest High School, was seventh in the 1,500, Tuscaorara’s Derek Johnson (Virginia) was seventh in the steeplechase and Robinson’s Lauren Berman (Virginia Tech) was 11th in the 1500.

Read More

0 Comments

One hundred days of running didn’t seem ambitious enough.

So Erika Fields figured she’d run until her birthday, that would be about four months.

Then she kept negotiating with herself.

“I’ll go until the time change,” she said. “I’ll go until it’s too cold. I’ll go until there isn’t any daylight. I’ll go until work travel starts up again.”

Fields doesn’t know how long she’ll keep her streak going, but she’s about to celebrate a year on Wednesday, June 9.

Read More

0 Comments

Fitsum Seyoum didn’t last long during freshman tryouts for the Tuscarora track team.

“Most of track season is pretty warm, but tryouts were early in the year, so it was pretty cold and wet,” former Tuscarora coach Troy Harry said. “He didn’t stick with it.”

Fortunately, Seyoum came back the next year and went on to Virginia Tech, where his mastery of the 3,000 meter steeplechase has led him to two Atlantic Coast Conference titles and his second straight trip to the semifinals of the NCAA Championships. What does he like about the event?

“Those water jumps shock your body each lap, that cold water really wakes you up,” he said.

This year, he’s going to be joined in the semifinals by former Husky teammate Derek Johnson, who was two years behind him in high school and now running for the University of Virginia. They led their heat during the NCAA quarterfinals. Seyoum has the U.S. Olympic Trials qualifier and Johnson needs to cut four more seconds to make it to the Trials. Georgetown’s Parker Stokes and George Mason’s Annabelle Eastman have also moved onto the NCAA steeplechase semifinals. Post-collegiately, Chantilly alumnus Sean McGorty and Lake Braddock alumna Katy Kunc have the Olympic Trials qualifiers for the steeplechase and McGorty has the Olympic standard.

Read More

0 Comments

Taylor Knibb had already gone an entire year without competing in a triathlon, so what was a few more months?

Possibly the difference between making the U.S. Olympic Team and staying home.

For the first time since she was 11 years old, growing up in Washington, D.C., Knibb had a year off, with the competitions she had planned following her graduation from Cornell University all scuttled because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In that year, she settled into her life as a professional in Boulder and toward the World Triathlon Championship Series race in Yokohama, Japan May 15. Winning that race made her the youngest U.S. Olympic triathlete in history at 23.  

Read More

0 Comments

The Marine Corps Marathon announced it will hold a race in-person Oct. 31.

Runners who had registered for the 2021 virtual races or who deferred from the canceled 2020 race, rather than opt for the virtual 2020 race, will have the first opportunities to register.  General registration will available, first-come-first-served, at noon eastern May 26.

Race fields for the marathon, 50k and 10k will be reduced and runners will be divided into waves beginning at 7 a.m., among other public health measures. to all Since 2013, the number of marathon finishers has ranged between 18,355-23,513, the 10k has seen 5,069-7,778 finishers and the inaugural 50k in 2019 drew 1,329 finishers.

“Throughout my many years heading the MCM Organization, we have faced various challenges and hurdled them all, often repeating the Marine Corps mantra to “adapt and overcome.” This year will be no different,” said race director Rick Nealis. “The MCM’s mission is to highlight the high standards and organizational excellence of the United States Marine Corps and we are excited to showcase that as we plan to safely gather and celebrate the 46th MCM in person.”

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list